vintage dresser hardware

Vintage Dresser Hardware

You’ve fall to the just place for antique drawer pulls! Antique Hardware & More is your ascent for drawer pulls hardware from many furniture periods, styles, and die for your antique equipment restoration projects.Antique Hardware & More has a vast selection of bedding draughtsman pulls, kitchen pulls and antique handle ironmongery for your supplies restoration and refinishing projects.  We dedicated to(predicate) these pages to the double post pulls that we sell intended for antique furniture, antique dresser drawers, galley drawers and kitchen cabinets from furniture periods intercept Art Deco, Arts & Crafts, Colonial Revival, Chippendale, Eastlake and Cottage, Hepplewhite and Sheraton, Mission, Traditional and Queen Ann, Victorian and Waterfall. We have impudence pulls, nickel plated pulls, antique copper pulls, zinc plated pluck and other finishes including our custom finishes. For our single post pulls see Tear Drop and Ring Pulls and Knobs.Our product list embrace not only popular but also single harvest drawer struggle including:Antique furniture pullsKitchen cabinet pullsDresser drawer pullsBrass draughtsman pullsVictorian pulls3.5 island drawer pulls4 island drawer pulls If there is anyway that we at Antique Hardware & More can assist you, do not hesitate to Contact Us.
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Vintage Dresser Hardware

Vintage Dresser Hardware

Welcome to Hinge Vintage Hardware. You are here for a reason. You need to find just the unite for that special project you are working on. You have found the right place if you are countenance for something vintage and beautiful. New reproduced items are pretty, but they are not old. The HINGE collection is from a time when the USA was producing some of the finest products in the world, and we all know – there is nothing like the real property. The collection you are about to explore is the life work of one man who started collecting home hardware and vintage circumflect after he returned abode from World War II. 80 – 90% of our vast inventory (some say in the millions) is filled with New Old Stock, which means ‘Old – but Never Used’. You can find article dating back to the 1700’s along with brand new items too. Only a small fraction of our products are shown on our website and we are always adding more, so check back often. Our HINGE-Engineers have created a beautiful 10,000 sq. ft. showroom in Orlando. Come visit us and we will be glad to show you this amazing collection called HINGE.
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Vintage Dresser Hardware

Wipe the cleaning product or solution off of the hardware with a dry cloth rag until there is no more dirt or grime.Note: If your hardware has a lot of tarnish or buildup, drain the hardware in a bowl with detersive solution. After the hardware has drench for awhile, gently brush the hardware with a soft fitch, such as a toothbrush, to carefully remove the buildup.
vintage dresser hardware 3

Vintage Dresser Hardware

The first hurdle was to find a dresser that was the right graver and even more importantly, the right bigness.  We didn’t change the layout of our bathroom at all so our new dresser vanity had to fit in the corner between the passage and the toilet.  It also required to be the right height – nobody wants a sink so low they have to subdue over to wash their custody or so tall washing your men is disagreeable.  The current standard height for a bathroom decline is 34 inches from the floor.  In most cases this means the counter also needs to be that tall, but if you are worn a vessel sink like I am, your dresser should be a few inches shorter.
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Vintage Dresser Hardware

I searched on Craigslist for a few weeks but didn’t have any luck.  Everything I saw was either the wrong size and design, the wrong style, or distance too expensive.  But as luck would have it, my grandmother’s élite friend was washing out her house and she just happened to have a dresser that was the perfect size.  I was efficient to score this beautiful dresser from 1932 for only $25. (It makes me feel so knowledgeable to point out it is from 1932, but really I only savey that because they stamped 1932 dresser right on the back.  So helpful.)
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Vintage Dresser Hardware

Since I was going to have to coff a new sink, I decided to look for an affordable capillary sink.  When turning a dresser into a pride, the biggest drawback is that the fall and plumbing can really death up gastrology up a share of your usable drawer space.  A drop-in decay sits below the top of the dresser so the fall itself captivate up a huge chunk of the top two drawers and the plumbing interest up even more after that.  A vessel sink sits on top of the dresser so only the drain pipes and water lines to the faucet take away from the draughtsman walk.
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Vintage Dresser Hardware

The first thing I did was paint my dresser.  In retrospect, this wasn’t a great plan.  I ended up having to do tons of touch upways to the paint later on.  In the anapophysis of turning the dresser into a vanity, it got moved around, bumped, and scraped a lot which doesn’t combine well with unimpaired paint.  If I were doing this all over again, I would wait and color the dresser right before connect the sink.
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Once the dresser was chosen, it was time to find a sink.  Again, I started by looking on Craigslist and at the Habitat for Humanity Restore but I didn’t find anything that would work.  The sink needed to be small enough to fit the top of my dresser with a few island to spare at the front and back.
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I strong to cosmetic this whole dresser including the top. I love the look of a dresser with a painted corporation and stained top, but I wanted to keep this vanity from graceful too country/farmhouse looking.  For this same reason, I didn’t distress the paint job to bring out the details like I usually do.  Because this is going to be an actual fixture in our house rather than just another piece of furniture, I wanted to modernize the look a coin so that it is more in keeping with the rest of the house.  As much as I love the farmhouse look that is super epidemic direct now, I just can’t fully commit to it when I’m decorating a 1970s brick ranch.
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Finally, I brushed on three coats of Minwax Satin Polycrylic to protect the paint finish.  I’ve had a few questions about whether it would have been a better idea to add a stone countertop over the dresser.  That could definitely be a great look, but I signior’t think it is necessary and it would obviously make this a more expensive project.  The painted peripheric protected with a good topcoat should hold up well.  I am planning to stay on top of wiping any splashes of water off the top of the dresser though.
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Thanks Rachel! As far as whether the top would withstand water, I think it depends. That is part of the reason I unmistakable to paint the top of my dresser – we have definitely had some water sinister on top of the dresser and water just beaded up because of the topcoat. I think we will be considerable safe as long it is just drips and not a flood! If the top were tarnish and sealed with a quality sealer like Waterlox, it might be okay. But the water might also leave some permanent water blemish. There’s also the wishing of adding some sort of counter although that would definitely raise the cost and compel it much harder to DIY!
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Glass doorknobs date back to 1826, when the process for pressing molten looking-glass into molds was invented, but they didn’t become omnipresent until after the United States entered World War I, in 1917. Cast brazen, bronze, and chains doorknobs, which had dominated the hardware market since the beginning of the Victorian era in 1860, were in short supply because metals were needed for airplanes and ammunition. “But there was still plenty of sand out there to make glass with,” says Kittel. And by 1920, the largest hardware makers, including Yale & Towne Manufacturing Co. of Connecticut and Barrows Lock Co. of Illinois, were mass-producing doorknobs of fontanel and machine-cut glass, and cut crystal to suit various house styles, wallet bigness, and savor. During that era, most glass knobs were clear and featured six, eight, or 12 facets. Their faces were destroyed so you could peer inside to see star, bullet, and pin-prick designs molded into their low-minded. Less vulgar were colored-glass knobs in robin’s egg and cobalt blues, emerald, amber, violet, white milk, and Vaseline glass (which gotta its yellow-green color from annex trace amounts of uranium to the mold.) Shapes also varied, from ovals with incised star patterns to crystal globes with tiny bubbles inside — a popular 1920s Art Deco style that works well with modern interiors now. The use of glass knobs continued through the ’40s, but by the ’50s sensibility in both structure and hardware had deviate, and Americans began favoring cleaner modern lines in gate. Before long, developers were outfitting passage in suburban ranch houses with utilitarian-looking steel orbs.

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